Co-Ops
What do you do when you are overwhelmed and feel like you can't do everything all by yourself? Join a co-op! Co-ops pull together the resources, strengths, and gifts of several people to help provide a more diverse, complete, and rewarding educational experience for your children.
Starting and Running a Homeschool Co-Op
Starting a Homeschool Cooperative
Many homeschoolers have found that involvement with a homeschool cooperative enhances their homeschooling experience. Some children thrive with the small group experience, so enrolling them in some group activities and classes will nurture that need. Keeping classes and activities small enables families to reap the benefits of the classroom setting with none of the drawbacks. Volunteers can serve as helpers and aides, keeping the ratio of student to adult low, as recommended by educational research. This article discusses some tips for starting a homeschool cooperative.
The Story of Two Desperate, Burned Out, Homeschool Moms
Robin Bray shares the story of innovation and creativity in approaching homeschooling burn out, and how these creative ideas led to the creation of a co-op.
Homeschool Co-operatives and Support Groups
A discussion of the advantages and potential problems of participating and running a co-op. Written from the perspective of a UK homeschooling parent.
Starting a Homeschool Co-Operative Overseas
Includes tips and ideas for starting a formal co-operative learning environment for the special situation of overseas living.
American Montessori Homeschoolers Co-op
A forum for communication for organized or established co-op's and individuals interested in organizing a Montessori Homeschool Co-op. Established Co-op's can share ideas and those interested in creating a co-op can get valuable advice and information.
Kansas Co-Ops
E.D.U.C.A.T.E. (Excellence, Diversity, Unity, Community, Acceptance, and Tolerance in Education)
E.D.U.C.A.T.E. is a circle of families who are currently homeschooling primarily for educational reasons. They provide a network of support, educational, and social opportunities. They share the belief that learning occurs at all ages and in a variety of ways. Monthly activities include: co-op, chess club, American Girls club, history co-ops, park days, field trips, educational activity days, parent's night out, and a monthly group meeting. They also host an annual Recognition Ceremony and other family socials such as the fall kick-off picnic.Most activities occur in the southern Johnson County area of Kansas.
Starting & Running a Homeschool Co-Op
Starting a Homeschool Cooperative
Many homeschoolers have found that involvement with a homeschool cooperative enhances their homeschooling experience. Some children thrive with the small group experience, so enrolling them in some group activities and classes will nurture that need. Keeping classes and activities small enables families to reap the benefits of the classroom setting with none of the drawbacks. Volunteers can serve as helpers and aides, keeping the ratio of student to adult low, as recommended by educational research. This article discusses some tips for starting a homeschool cooperative.
The Story of Two Desperate, Burned Out, Homeschool Moms
Robin Bray shares the story of innovation and creativity in approaching homeschooling burn out, and how these creative ideas led to the creation of a co-op.
Homeschool Co-operatives and Support Groups
A discussion of the advantages and potential problems of participating and running a co-op. Written from the perspective of a UK homeschooling parent.
Starting a Homeschool Co-Operative Overseas
Includes tips and ideas for starting a formal co-operative learning environment for the special situation of overseas living.
American Montessori Homeschoolers Co-op
A forum for communication for organized or established co-op's and individuals interested in organizing a Montessori Homeschool Co-op. Established Co-op's can share ideas and those interested in creating a co-op can get valuable advice and information.
Looking for Another State?
Featured Resources

As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links on this site.

Real Learning: Education in the Heart of the Home
This book is not about "school at home"--it is about something better. It is about Real Learning. Homeschooling pioneer Charlotte Mason wrote with great wisdom about providing young minds with a living books education. She urged teachers to present great ideas and stand back, allowing students to form relationships with the ideas. Elizabeth Foss carries Miss Mason's philosophy from the idealto the real. How does the busy home-educating mom balance the various needs of a houseful of children? How...
Alpha-Phonics
Alpha Phonics is a primer for beginning readers. It features 128 self-explanatory lessons, printed in large, clear calligraphy suitable for beginning readers. You'll find product information about Alpha-Phonics here.
They're Your Kids: An Inspirational Journey from Self-Doubter to Home School Advocate
For many people, their schooling was uncomfortable, tedious, and sometimes a waste of time and energy. This book offers the idea that the public school system is tragically flawed and that we are able to do better for our own children. Sam Sorbo, mom of three and wife of actor Kevin Sorbo, took the leap into homeschooling and found the joy and success she was seeking. Included are strategies for working parents, those who are scared to take the leap, and anyone who wants the best for their child...
Happy Phonics
Happy Phonics uses games to teach early reading skills. Simple yet entertaining and educational, these phonics games are printed on colorful, sturdy cardstock ready to cut out. Included is a mother-friendly guidebook which contains details on how to teach phonics and reading, how to pronounce and teach the phonics sounds, how to make your own simple beginning readers, and step-by-step teaching information for each phonics sound. Happy Phonics covers beginning to advanced phonics.
Kingdom of Children : Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)
More than one million American children are schooled by their parents. As their ranks grow, home schoolers are making headlines by winning national spelling bees and excelling at elite universities. The few studies conducted suggest that homeschooled children are academically successful and remarkably well socialized. Yet we still know little about this alternative to one of society's most fundamental institutions. Beyond a vague notion of children reading around the kitchen table, we don't know...