State Laws
Read the laws regulating home education in Kansas and browse through the case law and legal opinions relating to those laws, along with government publications relating to homeschooling and summaries of the laws.
Summaries and Explanations of Kansas Homeschooling Laws
Kansas Homeschool Legalities
Detailed analysis of all aspects of the laws pertaining to homeschooling in Kansas.
Colorado Homeschool Law - A Summary
A look at the statutes governing homeschooling in Colorado, provided by Christian Home Educators of Colorado (CHEC). This explanation details the three options to homeschool your children in the state of Colorado. 
The Importance of Recordkeeping in Colorado: Best Practices for What Records to Keep

Good records equip your student with proof of education for continuing their education, entering the military, or passing an employer’s background check. It may also prove valuable if there are ever any questions about your homeschool.

Homeschooling in Kansas: What You Need to Know
A list of legal requirements and guidelines for those wishing to home educate in the state of Kansas. Provided by the Kansas State Department of Education.
Kansas Home School Laws
The Home School Legal Defense Association provides a brief summary of the homeschooling laws in Kansas. Includes a link to a legal analysis of laws relating to homeschooling in Kansas.
Compulsory School Age in Colorado

Colorado law requires that every child who is 6 years old on or before August 1 of the current school year, and under the age of 17, must attend school. If a homeschool is operating under Colorado’s home education statute (Option 1), the parents may wait to begin actual instruction until their child is 7 years old; however, they must still submit a notice of intent beginning with the school year that the child turns 6 by August 1.

Is Homeschooling Legal in Kansas?
Homeschooling is perfectly legal in the state of Kansas. Unfortunately, Kansas’s statutes do not mention homeschooling specifically, and thus some confusion exists on this issue, especially among public school officials and occasionally among local legal authorities. However, among the state's legal authorities, which includes the Kansas Attorney General, the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS), the legal staff of the Kansas State Board of Education, and numerous district courts, the legality of homeschooling in Kansas is fairly well settled.
How to Withdraw Your Child from School in Colorado

If you want to start homeschooling during the school year and your child is currently enrolled in a public or private school, you may formally withdraw your child from that school. If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant.

Colorado Department of Education Home School Information
Colorado Department of Education has compiled information regarding home education in the state. Includes information about getting started homeschooling, subjects to teach, attendance requirements, recordkeeping, assessment and evaluations, and resources. 
CHEC Homeschool Guidebook for Colorado

Need a map for your homeschooling journey in Colorado? This classic go-to compendium used by countless families in Colorado is now completely updated and streamlined for you. The CHEC Homeschool Guidebook will give you tons of practical information, worksheets, resource lists, scriptural encouragement, and more – just what you need to homeschool in Colorado with confidence.

How to Homeschool in Colorado

This how to begin homeschooling guide is presented by CHEC, Christian Home Educators of Colorado. It details the basics, with the first steps for you to take and lots of great information to get started homeschooling in Colorado. 

How to Comply with Colorado's Homeschool Law

In Colorado, there are three options under which you can legally homeschool. You are free to choose the option that best meets your family’s needs. These options include homeschooling under Colorado's homeschool statute, homeschooling with an independent school, and homeschooling with a certified teacher. 

Public School Access for Homeschoolers in Colorado

Children participating in a non-public, home-based education program are allowed equal access to the public school’s extracurricular and interscholastic activities according to Colorado Revised Statutes § 22-33-104.5(6) and Colorado Revised Statutes § 22-32-116.5.

Colorado Home School Laws
The Home School Legal Defense Association provides a brief summary of the homeschooling laws in Colorado. Includes a link to a legal analysis of laws relating to homeschooling in Colorado.
Special Education Provisions for Colorado: Regulations and Resources for Your Special Needs Homeschool

If you are homeschooling a child with special needs, you need to follow your state’s homeschool regulations. There are no additional requirements for homeschooling children with special needs.

Kansas Statutes Pertaining to Home Education
Colorado Statute 22-33-104
Compulsory school attendance in the state of Colorado. 
Home School Laws from HSLDA
Find the laws pertaining to home education for all 50 states and U.S. territories.
House Joint Resolution 05-1040
Recognition of April 8, 2005, as Home Education Day in Colorado.
Colorado Statute 22-32-116.5
Extracurricular and interscholastic activities. Notwithstanding any other provision of this article, each school district and each public school, subject to the requirements of this section, shall allow any student enrolled in a school or participating in a nonpublic home-based educational program to participate on an equal basis in any activity offered by the school district or the public school that is not offered at the student's school of attendance or through the student's nonpublic home-based educational program. A school district or school shall not adopt or agree to be bound by any rule or policy of any organization or association that would prohibit any participation allowed by this section. Each nonpublic school may allow a student to participate in a particular activity offered by the nonpublic school, at the nonpublic school's discretion.
Colorado Statute 25-4-901

This statute relates to state of Colorado school entry immunization requirements. 

Colorado Statute 25-4-902

Details of the state of Colorado requirements for immunizations. 

Kansas Statute 72-53,100 Miscellaneous Provisions
Nonaccredited private schools; pupil records; definitions. As used in this act: (a) "Private elementary or secondary school" means an organization which regularly offers education at the elementary or secondary level and attendance at which satisfies the compulsory school attendance laws of this state, but which is not accredited by the state board of education. (b) "Pupil records" means all records, files and data of pupils who are or have been in attendance at a private elementary or secondary school. (c) "Official custodian" means any officer or employee of a private elementary or secondary school who is responsible for the custody and maintenance of pupil records.
Colorado Statute 25-4-903 - Exemptions from Immunization - Rules

Regulations concerning exemptions from required immunizations in the state of Colorado. 

Colorado Statutes - Complete Text
Online access to complete text of Colorado statutes. Those pertaining to home education include: 22-33-104 (Compulsory school attendance); 22-33-104.5 (Home-based education - legislative declaration - definitions - guidelines); 22-7-409, 1.2-d-III (Assessments); and 22-32-116.5 (Extracurricular and interscholastic activities).
Colorado Statute 22-33-104.5
The general assembly hereby declares that it is the primary right and obligation of the parent to choose the proper education and training for children under his care and supervision. It is recognized that home-based education is a legitimate alternative to classroom attendance for the instruction of children and that any regulation of nonpublic home-based educational programs should be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a variety of circumstances. The general assembly further declares that nonpublic home-based educational programs shall be subject only to minimum state controls which are currently applicable to other forms of nonpublic education.
Kansas Statute 72-53,102 Miscellaneous Provisions
Nonaccredited private schools; purpose of registration requirement. The purpose of this act is solely to make available to a school district, an accredited nonpublic school, or a private elementary or secondary school to which a pupil transfers, the name and location of the private elementary or secondary school from which the pupil transferred so that request may be made by the transferee school district, accredited nonpublic school, or private elementary or secondary school for the pupil's records.
Kansas Statute 72-53,101 Miscellaneous Provisions
Nonaccredited private schools; registration of name and address required; state board of education, administration and duties. (a) The official custodian of every private elementary or secondary school shall register the name and address of the private elementary or secondary school with the state board of education. (b) The state board of education shall administer the provisions of this act and shall prepare and maintain a compilation of the registrations submitted under subsection (a). (c) Upon transfer of a pupil from a private elementary or secondary school to a school district, an accredited nonpublic school, or another private elementary or secondary school, the state board of education, upon request of the school district, accredited nonpublic school, or other private elementary or secondary school therefor, shall make available the registration of the private elementary or secondary school from which the pupil transferred.
Kansas Statute 72-1111. Compulsory school attendance; exemptions.
The revelant text relating to homeschooling reads, "If the child is 16 or 17 years of age, the parent or person acting as parent, by written consent, or the court, pursuant to a court order, may allow the child to be exempt from the compulsory attendance requirements of this section."
Case Law and Legal Opinions
Pierce v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary
In Pierce v. Society of the Sisters, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that "the fundamental theory of liberty upon which all governments of this Union repose excludes any general power of the state to standardize its children by forcing them to accept instruction from public teachers only. The child is not the creature of the state."
Looking for Another State?
Featured Resources

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The Grammar Of Our Civility: Classical Education In America
This book explains the history of classical education in America and offers a vision for the role of classical education in 21st century America. 
Montessori International
Montessori International is the magazine for all parents and teachers. Montessori International magazine is a high quality colour education magazine with a Montessori focus and a truly child-centred approach. The magazine is for Montessori parents, nursery owners, teachers, and students with an interest in Montessori education.
Diana Waring--History Alive!
Diana Waring--History Alive! produces books, tapes, videos, and history curriculum for the homeschool market.
Better Late Than Early: A New Approach to Your Child's Education
In this book, Raymond and Dorothy Moore look at the research behind learning styles for children. The message of slowing down and responding to your child's readiness is a welcome contrast to the common practice of pushing young children through the system. They conclude that the best environment for children to learn is at home. 
Name That Country Game
"Dear Pen Pal, Konnichi wa! We've been to see Mt. Fuji. Name my country! Sayonara, Michiko." Challenge your group with this fast-paced geography game, created in 1992 by Educational Insights, Inc. Everyone begins at the post office. Players twirl a finely printed spinner (built into the game board itself) to select one of 60 countries. If the player can correctly identify the country's location on the board's numbered map, he or she may advance along the path to the finish. Bonus moves are won b...